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. christmas break is already over for president obama. he's flying back to washington tonight and aides say he's ready for a deal. it's not clear whether this trip is a sign of compromises to come or another display of theater showing the president is willing to work even as his opponents skip town. meanwhile, though, americans are growing skeptical. in the last week alone, gallup found a 15-point drop in the number of americans who think congress will negotiate a deal on the fiscal cliff. that's not all, holiday spending also hit its lowest rate since the 2008 recession, which retailers are blaming on the uncertainty in washington. so where do we go from here? well, since the house failed to get a vote on the tax package last week, all eyes are on the senate. a temporary deal that would basically extend all the tax cuts for those making under a quarter million. the deal would also rescue long-term unemployment benefits and instead of addressing those automatic spending cuts we've all heard about that are set for january 1st, this temporary deal would delay them for another six months. few are
for the president's second term with david ignatius of the "washington post" and journalist and author james mann. >> woodruff: then, we turn back to the tragedy in newtown, connecticut, as more victims are laid to rest one week after the shootings. >> brown: speaking out for the first time since the massacre, the nra's wayne lapierre rejects calls for new limits on guns. >> i asked congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. >> woodruff: and ray suarez talks to mark glaze, director of the pro-gun control advocacy group mayors against illegal guns. >> brown: plus, we hear from high school students from across the country, and gwen ifill talks with secretary of education arne duncan. >> schools have been forever the safe haven, often safest places in the community. and we need to continue to do everything in our power to make sure that they are. >> woodruff: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and
of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more than the democrats. president obama is basically going to do with the people voted him in for. i think he wil
: kwame holman updates washington's spending and tax stalemate after house republicans decide not to follow the leader. >> brown: and mark shields and michael gerson analyze the week's news. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the remaking of the obama administration's foreign policy team began today as the president nominated massachusetts senator john kerry to replace hilary clinton as secretary of state. the former presidential candidate who lost to george w. bush in 2004 got the nod after u.n. ambassador susan rice withdr
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
the cliff. that's where senate majority leader harry reid says we're headed. can washington save us with just five days to go? >>> plus, a proposal to give guns to school principals is gaining support. we're "outfront" with an arizona sheriff who's backing that plan. >>> and the 2012 election was all about viral videos, tonight we're counting down our favorite political video of the year. let's go "outfront." >>> i'm john avalon in for erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, a stark warning from capitol hill. senate majority leader harry reid says we're all headed for fiscal disaster. >> if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed, mr. president, the house of representatives, as we speak, with four days left before the first of the year, aren't here. >> we're now told the house will finally return to work on sunday. now, that's december 30th. in other words, less than 48 hours before we go over the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, president obama cut his hawaii vacation short to return to washington today. but has he been working on a deal? "outfront" tonight, reports fro
the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, president obama cut his hawaii vacation short to return to washington today. but has he been working on a deal? "outfront" tonight, reports from both ends of pennsylvania avenue. chief white house correspondent, jessica yellin, and senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. jessica, first, to you, the president's back in washington, wheels down. he left his christmas vacation early. but was this just a bit of showmanship, or has he been working on something specific? >> reporter: hey, john. well, today has been a bit of a quiet day here at the white house. publicly, the president has been scarce, no sign of him. behind closed doors, i'm told a few meetings internally, but mostly, relatively quiet. i expect we will see more from the president, perhaps we could even see him publicly tomorrow. perhaps he could even meet with or talk to some of the congressional leaders. the president's role in all of this, he can get each of the leaders to come closer on what the white house believes is already, pretty clearly, the framework for a final deal, and he can also
right now. >> battle lines. let's play "hardball." >> good evening, i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. it's five days until christmas, 12 till new years and the battle lines are drawn. the trenches have been dug. the president has made his promise and intends to keep it. that promise is fairness. he cannot go along with any republican deal that protects the wealthy. he will risk the cliff to keep his promise. if it comes to it, he'll leap right off of it. to do less would be a sign to his enemies a sign that they can beat him. well u they simply tried. the words out he wants former u.s. senator chuck hagel in nebraska for secretary of defense. he's a republly can and a combat veteran of vietnam. the neocons are out to stop him for what he is and what they aren't. he served in war right up front. he opposed unness wars like the ones we've been fighting. fighting and getting ourselves into all of these years. in other words, they opposed the secretary of defense who thinks the man is the commander in chief. there's not an obama vote among them, by the way. u.s. c
to washington as often, and i would say, even more often than the alaska members in the house and senate. he made -- they made a point to stop by his office on a regular occasion to talk to him about what has happened in the past, what's going on today, and what they look for in the future. earlier this year, senator inouye was in alaska at my invitation, his last trip to alaska. he told them a memorable story about his support of the trans alaska oil pipeline, which was controversial when he supported it in its construction. now, senator inouye has a unique style of how to tell stories, and you got to just pay attention and listen. they're no very to the point. senator inouye told this story told by opponents of the pipe lynn that it would -- of the pipeline that it would destroy the caribou. this was what he would told over and over again. again in his last trip, he was in front of a group of people, and i was anxious as he started to tawfnlg he said, i have this story tell you. he talked about this time of controversy about the alaska north slope and the oil pipeline and the caribou and w
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time. that does it for today's "washington journal." will be back tomorrow. the live coverage of the house of representatives live on c- span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 18, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable nan s. hayworth to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other t
in the rotunda. friday at 10:30 p.m. eastern, the public memorial will be held at the washington national cathedral. >> senator kay bailey hutchison, republican of texas, is retiring from the senate after serving four terms. she will be replaced by republican ted cruz, a former texas solicitor general. she delivers her farewell remarks on the senate floor. this is 25 minutes. week there would have been so much joy in the halls of the capitol bringing with the laughter and the anticipation of our seasons happiest time. but in just one weekend, a sadness have said in with the news of the massacre of innocent children in newtown, connecticut, followed by the loss of our wonderful colleague, senator daniel inouye. so i will leave this extraordinary institution and experience with a heavy heart for those who have been lost just in the last few days. i do want to thank you for asking me to represent them in washington. i want to thank the many people who have served on my staff for almost 20 years. i have to say i am touched that both senses, on both sides of this room are filled with my staff
one of which in washington is almost been totally discredited because they really haven't included a broad swath of the opposition, broad enough that would have legitimacy with the opposition back in syria itself. but there are some attempts and people are thinking about these things-perhaps because of what happened in iraq in 2003. >> wonderful. one more. yes, please. >> what this likelihood that the regime will use chemical weapons and what should we or could we do if they do? >> good question. that's one of the questions that no one has an answer, understand what circumstances would the regime use chemical weapons. i suspect they don't want to use them because that would galvanize the exact international response they're trying to avoid. the don't want this type of mass blood-letting that will compel the international community to intervene much more assertively than it has. so i don't think they're going to use chemical weapons. the fear is, though, if the regime -- if the opposition gains the upper hand, if the regime is on its last legs will they want to go down in flames or
'm chris matthews in washington. it's five days until christmas, 12 until new years and the battle lines are drawn. the trenches have been dug. the president has made his promise and intends to keep it. that promise is fairness. he cannot go along with any republican deal that protects the wealthy. he will risk the cliff to keep his promise. if it comes to it, he will leap right off it. to do less would be a sign to his enemies, a sign that they can beat him if they simply try. well, the president is being tested on another front tonight. the word is out he wants former u.s. senator chuck hagel of nebraska for secretary of dft defense. hagel is a republican and a combat veterans of vietnam. he would be first vietnam vet to head the pentagon. the neocons are out to stop him. he served in war right up front. he opposed unnecessary wars like the ones we have been fighting. fighting and getting ours into. in other words they oppose a secretary of dft who thinks like the man who is now the commander in chief. there is not an obama vote among them. jim moran, democrat from virginia, and eugene
. maybe sequestration is going to happen so for that let's go to washington. >> juliet: all right. tick-tock, tick-tock, time is almost up for lawmakers as we say to avert the fiscal cliff. they worked throughout the weekend in hopes of hammering out some sort of deal. >> dave: peter doocy is live in washington and we hustle you over to the capitol. and what is the latest, do you think we'll get something done? >> reporter: dave, we were told late in the evening that legislative staff was going to work through the night, but the only principal we heard from was mitch mcconnell who said he and his democratic counterparts have been trading paper all day saturday, but the only big news, mcconnell cared to share with us, in the state he represents, kentucky, louisville beat the university of kentucky by three and meanwhile, the officially republican weekly address features another republican senator explaining once again why a deal before monday night's deadline is so important. >> at a time when our federal debt's topped 16 trillion dollars, it's been more than three years since the senate
with me. i'm brooke baldwin here in atlanta. time to go, as we always do, to washington. "the situation room" with wolf blitzer begins right now. hey, wolf. >> hi, brooke. thanks very much. happening now, the connecticut shooting investigation appears to be moving into a new phase at one crime scene. stand by. >>> a blizzard, rain, and high winds. a winter storm is on the move and holiday travel potentially could be taking a big hit. information you need to know. >>> and a new hollywood film about the hunt for osama bin laden is getting a terrible review from three united states senators. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." right now, the house of representatives is getting closer to a showdown vote on the house speaker's plan to avoid that so-called fiscal cliff. it's a high stakes bargaining chip in the negotiations with president obama and it comes only 12 days before automatic tax hikes and spending cuts go into effect. that could take a painful toll on the u.s. economy. let's go to capitol hill. our senior congressional correspondent dana bash is standing by with the
now. why do i bring this up? is there anybody in washington, d.c. who is talking about cutting tax rates? and the answer is no. there's really not. there's not one person in this chamber who comes to the floor and talks about cutting tax rates. we might like to but we're in a tough economic crisis right now and folks are concerned about the revenue side of the equation. what folks are talking about, though, is not raising tax rates. for some reason, for reasons that i can't understand, mr. speaker, the president has gotten wrapped around the axle on an insistence that actual rates go up. speaker john boehner offered him revenue he said if you just want the money, we'll find a way to get money through taxes, it doesn't have to be through higher rates, we can do it through eliminating loopholes and exemses, broadening the base. the president said i want higher rates. when we're not talking about higher rate fless white house, mr. speaker, we're talking about fairness. i've got to tell you, mr. speaker, dadgummit, you and i are freshmen in this body, we came with the largest freshmen
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the society for giving me the chance to be here. thanks to mike who did so much to organize the event. he is an old friend. thank you, mike. i'm delighted to be here today with corbin. -- david corbin. we have two books that talk about robert byrd from different perspectives. my book is basically about the senate and the last great senate as i refer to it. senator byrd was the majority leader during the period of time i wrote about. it gives you an ensemble sense of how the senate works. the book originated in 2008. i had been in the senate in the 1970s and 1980s. by 2008, i decided the senate had become utterly unrecognizable to me. polarized and paralyzed, really quite dysfunctional. i decided to write a book about the senate when it was great, specifically when i was there. [laughter] when you do something like that, you ha
, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence of what i experienced and what i saw, i am not trying to write the defensive history and others will have a different perspective on things, but it was -- we were at war every day of the four and a half years i was in office, and as i write in the book it wasn't just the wars in iraq and afghanistan, it was daily wars with the congress, with other agencies, with the white house, and also i would say with my own building, with the pentagon. >> rose: fighting over what within the pentagon? >> trying to make the first priority of the pentagon to be successful in the wars we were already in, the pentagon bureaucracy is structured to plan for war, not to wage war, and so getting badly needed equipment to the troops fast in months rather t
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
to stand and say the pledge allegiance at a romney political rally and "washington
on a nuclear device and set it off in new york or washington or some other city. (instrumental music) >> the president wants $489 billion in defense cuts over ten years. pentagon officials say the goal is to create a smaller, flexible force that can fight traditional wars and mount special operations. >> now that we know the threats that are out there, where is our money being spent? >> the congressional budget office had an estimate that they put the total u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. now, that is 20 percent of all federal spending, that is more than half of all discretionary spending. it's a substantial commitment to the united states. >> we spend less and less of our defense dollars on things that actually defend us. fifty percent of our defense budget goes to personnel. much of that personnel is bureaucratic personnel manning various defense department sites. >> currently much of the money is going to conventional needs, personnel, r and d and nuclear weapons. >> the congress debated the issue of replenishment of our stock or at least making certain it was okay and
street journal" and another eight for "the washington post". in the course of this work, he reported on places as varied as somalia, bosnia, iraq and afghanistan, and he's been part of two teams that won the pulitzer prize. as i've gotten to know tom over these past few years, eve learned that he's that rarest of finds: a disruptive thinker whose energy and creativity combine in an interesting way. he constantly pushing us to think more nimbly and more provocatively, and that's a spirit that infuses tom's new book, "the generals." he explores generalship of good and bad. he traces the history of george marshall from world war ii, william westmoreland in vietnam to colin powell in the gulf war and to the generals who commanded in iraq from 2003 on. the generals argue that is the military's changed in the way it rewards good generalship and punishes bad and that the gulf has grown ever wider. tom's is a provocative argument and one that we will examine in some detail. joining tom is susan glaser, one of the nation's top national security journalists. susan's the editor-in-chief of fore
. for more information, visit >> now joining us on booktv is an old washington hand and that is ambassador stuart eisenstadt. he is also author. ambassador eisenstadt, wiry writing a book about the future of the jewish. >> we survived 3000 years of calamities culminating in a holocaust of her own time and yet we have survived and thrived and continued to societies, even those that didn't want us. now we have a whole new set of 21st century challenges and the question is, having survived this terrible times, can we now survive prosperity, success and integration. a look at this from two perspectives. i look at the global forces that affect america, american jews and israel, everything for the shift of power from the united states and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization of the digital era about how to deal with the 1.6 million muslims in the world come across to the iranian nuclear power. and i also like an internal press, low birthrates, assimilation and whether we can in effect succeeded at a time that we are more successful than matter and in
washington post," david is a renowned writer of fiction and nonfiction and is later during his most recent string of best-selling works of spy fiction. david is well known for his command of international affairs and his keen insight into the working of government and other factors. with these two gentlemen, we're poised for an illuminating an intriguing conversation about the world, the future and revenge of geography. bald and david, over to you. >> thank you. i think you're probably not supposed to see this as a serious moderator, but i love this book. it's embarrassing how architect it is and how many post its mouth i put not to flatter the teacher but because i really liked it. i'm going to try to walk the audience through this. we have bob walk the audience through and i would like to start with a provocative opening comment that you make. you set my reporting over three decades has convinced me that we all need to recover a sensibility of time and space that has been lost in the information age when the molders of public opinion - against the hours that will to let them talk about t
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)